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Thursday, 15 September 2016

Optimizing deoxidation and desuIphurization during vacuum induction melting of alloy 718 is now online and free to members of IOM3.

My seminal paper:

Optimizing deoxidation and desuIphurization during vacuum induction melting of alloy 718, J. Alexander,

is an indispensible reference of fundamental importance for the very highest quality (and not, mentioned higher productivity) manufacturing by Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM)  of a large family of alloys,(high intergrity materials such as aero-engine quality Nickel based superalloys (and similar materials). My paper was first briefly reported at a Superalloy meeting in London UK (1982) then fully published in 1984-85, in the, then new, journal, Materials Science and Technology (IOM3, UK).

This work has now been made available, online, by the UK Institute of Minerals,Mining and Materials (IOM3) and their publisher (Taylor and Francis) UK. As mentionned this work is now freely available to members of IOM3 via their website www.iom3.org.

Naturally, I, as the author, and original developper of the above work  while at Imphy SA, now APERAM, in France, (Burgandy Region, Department 58, La Nièvre) remain available to discuss and assist companies with such improvements if required. Most of this work has been adopted in regular production.

James Alexander is a Free-Lance Consultant and Translator (Bilingual French-English) 
Specialialities-process metallurgy, technology transfer (Japan-Invar for Liquid Gas Transport & India-Ministry of Defense India MIDHANI project, Hyderabad,India.

To cite this article: J. Alexander (1985) Optimizing deoxidation and desuIphurization during vacuum induction melting of alloy 718, Materials Science and Technology, 1:2, 167-170, DOI: 10.1179/mst.1985.1.2.167 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/mst.1985.1.2.167

Other Citations:

Sulphur Control in Nickel-Based Superalloy Production Dipl.-Ing. J. Morscheiser1 , Dipl.-Ing. L. Thönnessen2 , Prof. Dr.-Ing. B. Friedrich1 1 IME Process Metallurgy and Metal Recycling, RWTH Aachen University Intzestraße 3 52056 Aachen NB The date of my work is incorrectly referrences as 1995 (ie ten years late!!!)

((ALEXANDER, J.: Optimizing deoxidation and desulphurization during vacuum induction melting of alloy 718, in Materials Science and Technology, Vol. 1, 1995,(should be 1985) p. 167-170

and correctly cited as one would expect by Prof A.Mitchell  renowened also as a first class consultant

THE MAGNESIUM PROBLEM IN SUPERALLOYS A. Mitchell, M. Hilbom, E. Samuelsson and A. Kanagawa Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering The University of British Columbia Vancouver, B.C., Canada, V6T lW5

4. J. Alexander: Material Science and Technology, Feb. 1985, V.l, pp. 167- 170.  

Monday, 20 June 2016

Greening Power from The Nickel Institute

Greening Power: "How nickel is enabling the shift to low-carbon energy"



"Where and how the world finds its energy is changing. Yet how nickel-containing materials are enabling and supporting this dynamic process may not seem obvious until one looks closely."


-Hydro Power: "By far the most important to date and with a long engineering and economic history'

-Solar, wind...

-Future material needs:


Are the production of energy and power themes, where the importance of Nickel (Ni) and its alloys are illustrated.


An extended treatment may found in The Nickel Institute Magazine: " 

Greening Power

How nickel is enabling the shift to low-carbon energy

Short of time? - The Institutes Conclusion: 
"Questions of materials supply and demand have led researchers to consider the implications of supply constraints to different economic and technical choices for energy production.1 Of current scenarios in use by different institutions, two were modeled for the period 2010-2050: Market First (where economics have primacy) and Policy First (where governments take strong measures to achieve social and environmental goals).
The mix of energy sources shows dramatic differences. Note, however, that it doesn’t matter which scenario or variation dominates by 2050. Nickel and nickel-containing materials and chemicals will be there to enable technologies and sustain the electrical grids upon which societies depend."
 "



'via Blog this'

Tuesday, 19 April 2016

New Research Chair will tackle the structural integrity of nuclear power stations - Royal Academy of Engineering

New Research Chair will tackle the structural integrity of nuclear power stations - Royal Academy of Engineering:



'via Blog this'

Frontiers | Sequestering CO2 by Mineralization into Useful Nesquehonite-Based Products | Carbon Capture, Storage, and Utilization

Frontiers | Sequestering CO2 by Mineralization into Useful Nesquehonite-Based Products | Carbon Capture, Storage, and Utilization:

ALSO

Shale Gas Debate-UK widget added to my pages. NB. CO2 sequestration and use as a raw material in innovative materials

Read more: http://management-related-bsc-mba.blogspot.com/2016/04/shale-gas-debate-uk-widget-added-to-my.html#ixzz46IEilDMP



The struggle control and reduce  ever increasing CO2 gas (and all major green house gases)  is far from over.

Many thanks to The Insitute, IOM3 -Materials World (MW) prompted by their page,"members letters" in particular to F. Glasser and his team at Aberdeen Uni.,Scotland for their work in the "Extraction of CO2 like Sulphur") and CO2 capture in cement and concrete.

Cf. REF's as follows:

1. F.P. Glasser et al. Sequestering CO2 by Mineralization into Useful Nesquehonite-Based Products.
Iom3.org nanocem-cements-future

2. F.P.Glasser et al. Magnesium based cements for CO2 Capture and Utilisation. Cement and Concrete Research.


READ MORE

'via Blog this'

LINK to materials approach to CO2 sequestration and use as a raw material via innovative materials and manufacturing processes


Shale Gas Debate-UK widget added to my pages. 

NB. CO2 sequestration and use as a raw material in innovative materials is a strong materials chemistry approach to a major current and unfortuneatley ongoing problem.


Read more on my "This above all" blog page:Management-related-post shale-gas-debate-uk /2016/04

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

LINK_Report: Science Ecosystem 2.0: how will change occur? | Connected Researchers


Report: Science Ecosystem 2.0: how will change occur? | Connected Researchers on Conversations on Innovations. A most useful site especially for the research communities.


Best wishes all for the enormous efforts required collectively to meet current and near-future global, ecological and economic human needs currently under great stress!

Friday, 8 April 2016

Ultrathin Photovoltaics Produced at MIT story brought by IHS Engineering360



MIT researchers place a lightweight solar cell on top of a soap bubble. Image source: Joel Jean and Anna Osherov.


Incredible Technological feat from MIT!





Ultrathin Photovoltaics Produced at MIT | IHS Engineering360





"Researchers at MIT have now demonstrated the thinnest, lightest solar cells ever produced. Though it may take years to develop into a commercial product, the laboratory proof-of-concept shows a new approach to making solar cells that could help power the next generation of portable electronic devices.

The new process is described in a paper by MIT professor Vladimir Bulović, research scientist Annie Wang, and doctoral student Joel Jean, in the journal Organic Electronics.
Bulović, MIT’s associate dean for innovation and the Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Professor of Emerging Technology, says the key to the new approach is to make the solar cell, the substrate that supports it, and a protective overcoating to shield it from the environment, all in one process. The substrate is made in place and never needs to be handled, cleaned, or removed from the vacuum during fabrication, thus minimizing exposure to dust or other contaminants that could degrade the cell’s performance.
“The innovative step is the realization that you can grow the substrate at the same time as you grow the device,” Bulović says.
In this initial proof-of-concept experiment, the team used a common flexible polymer called parylene as both the substrate and the overcoating, and an organic material called DBP as the primary light-absorbing layer. Parylene is a commercially available plastic coating used widely to protect implanted biomedical devices and printed circuit boards from environmental damage. The entire process takes place in a vacuum chamber at room temperature and without the use of any solvents, unlike conventional solar-cell manufacturing, which requires high temperatures and harsh chemicals. In this case, both the substrate and the solar cell are “grown” using established vapor deposition techniques.""
REF: February 25, 2016

High Purity Cr sources for Superalloys

Energy for th Future:Phil.Trans.A-Vol. 365, N° 1853 / April 15, 2007, curtesy The Royal Soc. London

Engineered foams and porous materials: Phil Trans A. Vol 364, N° 1838 / 06 curtesy_The R Soc. Lond